Are You Losing Sleep Due To Chronic Pain?

Coping with chronic pain can be a day-to-day struggle. A good night’s sleep can be one of the best ways of reducing chronic pain– but what if your pain is so severe that it is keeping you from sleeping?

If your pain is causing you to toss and turn at night, here are a few ways in which you can improve your sleep quality.

Seek professional help

If pain is keeping you up at night, it may be time to talk to a medical professional. They may be able to offer medication that can help reduce pain and so that you can sleep more easily.

Services such as Ships MED offer multiple forms of pain relief for common causes of chronic pain such as arthritis, lower back pain, and nerve damage. This could even include injections and surgery to reduce pain.

Meanwhile, certain pain may have triggers which a doctor may be able to help you identify. Migraines are a popular example of chronic pain that is often caused by certain triggers such as specific foods or even a change in routine. By avoiding these triggers, you may be able to ease the pain and sleep easily.

Upgrade your bedding

When it comes to neck pain and back pain, you may want to consider the bedding you’re using. Soft mattresses can often aggravate back pain. Meanwhile, having too many pillows could be making neck pain worse.

Companies like Happy Beds offer a range of orthopedic mattresses which could help to improve comfort at night if you suffer from back pain. Similarly, there are specific pillows for neck pain that you can try. A doctor or physiotherapist may be able to recommend bedding options for your condition, or you may be able to talk to bedding expert.

Take time to de-stress before bed

Stress results in the release of a hormone called cortisol. This can often aggravate sensitivity to pain. On top of this, stress makes the mind more alert, prevent the release of sleep hormones and contributing to insomnia.

If you go to bed feeling stressed, it’s likely you’ll struggle to get to sleep more and the pain could be worse. Get into a habit of engaging in destressing activities before bed. Having a hot bath is a good example of a destressing activity – this floods the body with endorphins and relaxes muscles, helping to fight stress and inflammation simultaneously. Meditation, listening to music and reading could be other activities to try.

If you can, avoid looking at bright screens an hour before bed as these can delay the release of sleep hormones by tricking the brain into thinking it’s still day.

Contributed Content

Comments are closed.